The feel of an object's surface - its physical texture - depends on the degree to which it is broken up by its composition or treatment. The more broken, the rougher the texture. This not only determines how we feel it, but also how we see it. Rough surfaces intercept light rays, producing an often irregular pattern of lights and darker; glossy surfaces reflect the light more evenly, giving a less broken appearance.  As we see these patterns of different values, our memory of touching surfaces with similar characteristics then triggers a tactile response or sensory reaction. Thus, we can predict an object's feel without ever touching its surface. 

CG Grass

CG Grass

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